Spartacus The Gladiator

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Spartacus, dt. Spartakus, war ein römischer Sklave und Gladiator. Historische Bedeutung erlangte er als Anführer eines nach ihm benannten Sklavenaufstandes im Römischen Reich der Antike während der späten Römischen Republik. Spartacus, dt. Spartakus (gestorben 71 v. Chr. in der Zweiten Schlacht am Silarus​), war ein römischer Sklave und Gladiator. Historische Bedeutung erlangte er. Im Jahr 73 vor Christus wagt ein gefangener Gladiator das Ungeheuerliche: Spartacus führt Roms Sklaven in einen Aufstand gegen die Supermacht. Doch das. Ein bekannter Gladiator - Spartacus. Als Gladiator wird ein professioneller Kämpfer in dem Antiken Rom bezeichnet. Gladiatoren starben und kämpften für die. tastystuff.se - Kaufen Sie Spartacus - Der Gladiator Von Rom günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und.

Spartacus The Gladiator

Das Leben des Spartacus wurde oft verfilmt. Doch in vielen Streifen wimmelt es von Fehlern. So war der Gladiator kein Grobian, sondern recht. Spartacus (Spartacus, A.C.) Es ist eine historische Figur in einem amerikanischen Film beruhte auf (selbst. Spartacus, dt. Spartakus (gestorben 71 v. Chr. in der Zweiten Schlacht am Silarus​), war ein römischer Sklave und Gladiator. Historische Bedeutung erlangte er. Mehr zum Thema. Und von ihnen gibt es unzählige im Römischen Reich! Geheime Casino Tricks Buch cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. Plutarch hat in einer seiner Doppelbiographien über Crassus von Spartacus berichtet. Manche sehen in ihm sogar einen Vorkämpfer für Top Apps For Ipad Rechte der Unterdrückten. Zusammenfassung Inhalt dieser Seite: Wer war Spartacus?? Hier im Solitaire Spielen Pausenspiele, der Gladiatorenschule, werden er und die anderen Männer als Gefangene gehalten. Roulette Killer System den farbigen Silbentrenner sind die Bücher von Klasse 2 beginnend für leistungsstarke, bis zu Klasse 6 für leistungsschwächere Kinder einsetzbar. Erstellen Sie sich jetzt Ihr persönliches Konto und profitieren von zusätzlichen Vorteilen:. Für ihre Einhaltung sorgte ein Hauptschiedsrichter summa rudis.

Spartacus The Gladiator Video

\ Spartacus The Gladiator

I don't want to give away too much of the plot, but Spartacus returns from serving wi I received this book as a free giveaway, and I'm glad I did!

I don't want to give away too much of the plot, but Spartacus returns from serving with the Roman army to find out that his father The King of Trace and brother heir to the throne have been murdered.

He had served with the Romans to find out about their training techniques and battle strategies so he could return home and lead a war against Rome.

He plots revenge on the current king, but winds up being captured and sold to a gladiator training camp. The thought of fighting for the entertainment of Rome is too much for him to bear, so he leads a revolt against the owner of the camp.

From here, he is pursued across Italy by Roman legions that seek to quash his rebel army of former slaves and gladiators.

Also provided in the book are maps and a VERY helpful glossary for the terms used in the book. In his afterword, author Ben Kane explains that he DID take some liberties with the story since only about words survive about history as far as Spartacus is concerned.

He also mentions that he is working on a sequel that is due out in late Kane, if you read this, thank you for opening my eyes to a different genre.

I look forward to reading more from you in the coming years View all 5 comments. I was given this book through the Goodreads Giveaway program.

This was my first go at Spartacus fiction, and my first Ben Kane read, and I was therefore very excited to dig in. But I had nearly reached a third of the way through the book when I had to abandon it.

I simply have no desire to read novels that include graphic, very explicit rape scenes. And from what I've read from some of the other reviews, there were several more even worse ones awaiting me.

As you might expect, this novel is very v I was given this book through the Goodreads Giveaway program. As you might expect, this novel is very violent and graphic in nature.

I anticipated that, and am no stranger to it in historical fiction, being a fan of Bernard Cornwell , Steven Pressfield , Robert Low , etc.

Even then, though, I felt the violence was gratuitous, or at least the description of it was. I was never fully engaged with the characters, never cared for Spartacus, and I didn't buy his relationship with Ariadne.

I looked forward, though, to following the two of them to see where Kane and the historical record would take us, but I'll have to delve elsewhere to get my answers.

It's a shame. I seem to be one of the few who are critical of this novel, so I don't want to dissuade anyone from trying it.

Give it a go, but only if you're prepared for lots of blood, cursing f-bombs, etc. View all 11 comments. Apr 01, Sheree rated it it was amazing Shelves: own , historical-fiction , reviews , read-in Ben Kane covers the well known story of Spartacus with a brilliant balance of historical detail and fictional flare bringing the story to life in fascinating, horrifying and brutal glory.

Spartacus is known as one of the greatest military commanders in history, a master tactician, a man of strength, intelligence, honour, loyalty and while understanding the inhumanities and cruelties inflicted during war he possesse 4.

Spartacus is known as one of the greatest military commanders in history, a master tactician, a man of strength, intelligence, honour, loyalty and while understanding the inhumanities and cruelties inflicted during war he possessed a strong moral code.

Skilled in Roman warfare from years spent in the Roman legions, Spartacus returns to his home village after a ten year absence to be betrayed, sold into slavery and trained as a gladiator in the Ludus in Capua.

He masterminds the escape from the Ludus and along with fellow gladiators trains and leads a growing army of slaves in rebellion against the might of Rome.

Kane's vivid writing and graphic descriptions give an excellent sense of time and place. Not for the faint hearted; battle after battle, violence, pillaging, rape, carnage and the horror endured by women of this time was difficult to read but I couldn't get enough Spartacus and the 'Gladiator War'.

If I'm nit-picking my one query would be on the authenticity of the 'f-bomb' in 74BC?? After finishing what would have to be one of my favourite reads this year I cannot wait for the sequel, Spartacus: Rebellion.

May 24, Holly P rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , ancient-world. I am probably one of the few people where this novel is my first foray into the legend of Spartacus.

In this book Ben Kane does a fantastic job in bringing to life the man that united slaves and common people alike to take on the mightiest army in the world.

We meet Spartacus as he is coming home to Thrace after spending several years fighting in the Roman Auxiliary. Just because he I am probably one of the few people where this novel is my first foray into the legend of Spartacus.

Just because he fought on the side of the Rome does not mean he is friend to the Romans though. His purpose in serving with the Romans is to learn all he can about their brilliant military tactics so he can build an army of his countrymen upon his return and take on Rome himself.

Spartacus finds things have changed in his absence though and the current ruler of Thrace recognizes Spartacus as a threat and sells him to a man looking to purchase slaves for a Gladiator school.

He is accompanied by the beautiful priestess Ariadne who decides she would rather take her chances at the Gladiator school as Spartacus' wife than endure the attentions of the repugnant Thracian King.

I love characters that do not lay down in the face of defeat and Spartacus definitely fits the bill. While most people would resign themselves to a violent death at the hands of a fellow Gladiator, Spartacus sets about to earn the respect of his fellow slaves, unite them in revolt, and even more unlikely, to keep them united to face down the Romans.

The fight scenes both in the Gladiator school and against the Roman armies were really well done and I felt completely transported into the time period while reading them.

He proves himself to be a brilliant general time and again. Also realistically portrayed was the havoc Spartacus' army of slaves wreaked on the countryside.

This book has no shortage of blood, guts, and the horrors of war. This book does contain profanity, violence, sex scenes, and rape so be forewarned if you are squeamish about any of these.

I also liked the supporting characters as well including Carbo- a roman citizen who joins the gladiator school when his family falls on hard times and pledges himself to Spartacus and the aforementioned Ariadne.

There are also a wealth of other warriors among Spartacus' ranks including Crixus the Gaul-a thoroughly unlikable man who challenges Spartacus for power every chance he gets, and allies Atheas and Taxacis.

I really wished to know more of these characters but I also realize that in a story with so many characters you can't give everyone their due and the book was already so large the author had to split the story into two books the second of which is coming out later this year.

The constant reference of Ariadne as Spartacus' wife was puzzling to me since there was no formal ceremony making this so.

They just stated their intent to become man and wife and it was done. After doing a little research, I discovered that mutual consent was really all it took to be married in the time period the book takes place.

I wish this had been explained somewhere along the line. With the exception of Ariadne there is not an abundance of female characters in this book and what ones there are don't fare well.

This is different from what I normally read because most of the historical fiction I pick up has at least one strong female view.

That is not to say women won't enjoy this book. If you like an underdog story and aren't bothered by the more difficult themes I mentioned above you probably won't find a more action packed and exciting portrayal of the Spartacus story than this one.

Admittedly, little bothers me enough to keep me from reading a good book and I enjoyed this one quite a lot.

Consider me a new fan of Ben Kane's writing. I can't wait for the continuation of Spartacus' story in the next installment!

View 1 comment. Jun 23, Joseph Finley rated it really liked it. In the novel, Spartacus is a Thracian and veteran of the Roman legions who studies their tactics in the hope of going home and leading his own army against the hated Romans.

When he returns to Thrace, however, Spartacus learns a usurper has killed the king, as well as his own father, and seized the throne. Spartacus plots a rebellion, but when the king discovers his plans, Spartacus is captured and sold to a Roman slaver.

Despite this setback, Spartacus gains an unlikely companion in Ariadne, a In the novel, Spartacus is a Thracian and veteran of the Roman legions who studies their tactics in the hope of going home and leading his own army against the hated Romans.

Despite this setback, Spartacus gains an unlikely companion in Ariadne, a priestess of Dionysus who offers to join him in slavery in order to escape the lecherous king who longs to rape her.

The fact that Ariadne goes with Spartacus and remains his companion throughout his slave rebellion is the first of several surprises in the novel.

Another surprise is Carbo, a Roman teenager who joins the ludus gladiator school in Capua as an auctoratus sort of a gladiator for hire after his family falls on hard times.

Once in Capua, the novel tracks the historical story of Spartacus, from his gladiator revolt and escape from the ludus, to his massive slave rebellion against the Romans.

There is more to the novel than just gladiators versus the Romans, however, as Spartacus faces equally dangerous enemies in his own ranks while trying to hold together an army of Thracians, Gauls, and Germans.

Crixus and Oenomaus — historical gladiators with whom readers may be familiar from other versions of the Spartacus story — play prominent roles in the novel, as does Marcus Licinius Crassus, the wealthiest man in Rome, who is charged with ending the slave rebellion.

The novel never gets to the climactic battle between Crassus and Spartacus as this is the first book of what the author suggests will be a two book series.

But Spartacus the Gladiator stands on its own, and in the end proves to be a bloody good read! I liked a lot this book. The story of Spartacus is compelling, and I believe this was greatly told.

From the Ludus to almost the Alps, there're a lot of battles, struggles and animosity. Besides Spartacus' doing, we see a lot of Carbo, a made up personage, and a Roman one, nonetheless, following Spartacus and the slaves.

His story is quite beautiful and sad - and I'll be rooting for a meeting between him and Crixus on the next book. I have no idea if such thing will happen, but one can hope.

Jul 02, Rick rated it really liked it Shelves: waiting-sequels. I started reading this thinking it would be a copy of the Kirk Douglas film Ben Kane is an execellent story teller and has given the Spartacus tale a whole new twist.

I am certainly going to read the next book when it is released. Jan 24, Magda Kossakowska rated it it was amazing. Feb 28, Ronnie, rated it really liked it.

A must for anyone who likes the TV series,. Sep 09, S. Turney rated it it was amazing. Given that, I will not be writing a separate review for each book.

This review is for both Spartacus the Gladiator and Spartacus: Rebellion. His Forgotten Legion series was groundbreaking in a number of ways and quite astounding as a debut.

I was then fairly stunned by Hannibal, which I consider No…. I was then fairly stunned by Hannibal, which I consider to be one of the finest pieces of ancient Historical fiction written.

Despite the high quality of FL, Hannibal showed a new maturity in writing and more depth of character and soul. So on to Spartacus. What I will say about these books is that there has been a slight change in conventions that I found refreshing and excellent more of that shortly.

But, that being said, the general tale of Spartacus is a matter of record that most people will have at least a basic knowledge of.

So, bear in mind that you sort of know how this saga is going to end. So prepare yourself. Similarly, in the second book, a number of the smaller battles or skirmishes that are not critical are referenced only in reminiscence or conversation, and I kind of missed seeing them myself.

Again, perhaps just my bloodthirsty tendencies showing through. Often two characters will converse, but their private thoughts have a secondary conversation above them.

This really gives a boost to the understanding of the motives and desires of the characters. Another big win for me was the character of Carbo.

I will say that he is in no way a sidekick or comedy relief. He is a strong protagonist in his own right, but helps to balance Spartacus.

Well done for Carbo, Ben. Not only is he an important character, a plot foil, a companion and so much more, he is also the main chance the book has for any sort of positivity in the outcome.

Similarly, I loved Navio, and the portrayal of the young Caesar. On the Roman side, it is interesting to see Caesar and Crassus at this stage in their development, giving an insight into what creates the men who will exist and are portrayed in the Forgotten Legion.

Incidentally, as well as the sadness of the inevitable conclusion, there is one scene in the first book a death scene that I actually found worse.

It was for me a harrowing read with all the soul-crushing skill of a Guy Gavriel Kay work. Fabulous in its awfulness.

In an echo of the plot construction of the Forgotten Legion, there is an overriding element of the mystical and the divine in this work which goes deeper than simply describing the attitudes of the people in the setting, but actually provides foretellings, insights, and even explanations as to the reasons for the events of the Third Servile War.

One day I may well go back through these books and read them with a different mindset, going in to them with the idea that the whole string of events is somewhat defined and informed by prophecy and divine whim, rather than the straight historical viewpoint I attacked them with this time.

All in all, these two books create the deepest, most realistic and yet refreshingly different telling of the Spartacus rebellion yet. Forget Blood and Sand and Kirk Douglas.

The characters here are authentic feeling and very much sympathetic, even on the Roman side. The undertones of divine influence are subtle and yet powerful.

As always, Ben appears to have meticulously researched everything and the historical accuracy of the books is as strong as I can believe it could get.

There could always be the possibility of a prequel, of course, since sequels are unrealistic. Mar 03, Scott rated it it was amazing Shelves: historic-fiction.

Having been to Rome recently and explored the Colosseum and visited villas replicating Ancient Rome, the aesthetic of the Roman Empire is fresh in my mind.

There are some cringey parts in the story, such as the objectification of women and slaves, but hey, this is Ancient Rome after all.

I can say I do wish Kane would have slowed down the pace of the story a bit. Some characters could have benefited from a bit more polishing.

I appreciated the contemporary narration and dialogue as well. Of my favorite books the last couple of years. May 22, Lee Franklin rated it liked it.

My personal favourite era. Loved the battle scenes, strategies and descriptors in this novel. Ben Kane definitely knows his stuff there and his historical knowledge is richly evident without being too up your nose.

My only criticism would be that I found the dialogue a little wooden and would of knocked my score down to a 3. I'm still reading the next one.

I read some complaints about how Aridnae and other women were represented in the books, but that's truthfully pretty much how it was for the My personal favourite era.

I read some complaints about how Aridnae and other women were represented in the books, but that's truthfully pretty much how it was for them and this character at least had some autonomy.

Rob E Howards books were far more sexist, but that was as much his era as the stories they were in. But if it bothers you that much, do as I do and write your own.

History was written by the the winners and by common knowledge Romans were the worst losers. How many champions and women did they write out of history?

Oct 03, Beorn rated it it was ok Shelves: historical-fiction , romans. The thing that this book has confirmed for me about Ben Kane's books is they can be like Marmite to me even though I actually love Marmite but that's a confusing tangent.

They're well written and relatively engaging yet quite often are unremarkable and don't stay with you very long once you've finished them.

Do not get me wrong. I am not writing off Ben Kane altogether as I have found myself really enjoying notable chunks of his books before - such as the very human realistic nature of the char The thing that this book has confirmed for me about Ben Kane's books is they can be like Marmite to me even though I actually love Marmite but that's a confusing tangent.

I am not writing off Ben Kane altogether as I have found myself really enjoying notable chunks of his books before - such as the very human realistic nature of the characters in his first Hannibal novel - it's that for the most part, certainly with this book, you're left with the feeling that yes it's enjoyable enough for you to read solidly but it's not something that will be brought to mind whenever anyone makes you think of Roman period fiction.

I invariably feel pretty guilty when, in this internet age, it's so easy to get in touch with a lot of your favourite historical fiction authors, usually on Twitter, they prove to be such nice friendly people only for you to come along and write negative reviews about their hard-crafted books.

So if you're reading this Ben, sorry. Looking at this book specifically, it's relatively well written but it feels relatively mechanical and going through the motions.

The majority of the interesting tangents you hope to see come to fruition seem to come to a head only to then be put clumsily aside in favour of keeping to the same slightly wearisome path.

Kind of like sticking to the pavement rather than weaving around, exploring and making your own path.

The 'Spartacus' character I'd always grown up with and been familiar was a charismatic leader with a keen tactical mind that throws himself against the might of Rome with a cunning feral ferocity.

There's very little such charisma or character here. The slaves that flock to join Spartacus seem to do so, at least the way he writes it, simply because of the victories he's brought rather than his charisma as a leader.

Personally speaking I think Conn Iggulden's brief take on Spartacus as a minor tangent early on in his Emperor series was a far more empathetic engrossing version than Mr Kane's.

Overall, the feeling I'm left with from this book is that it's an entertaining enough read as you're progressing through it though not one that will spark your imagination on fire or stay you with you much longer than when you reach the end.

Standard-fare Roman fiction, middle of the road. Jun 03, Ruth Hill rated it liked it Shelves: e-books , historical.

I am a historical novel afficianado, so when I was offered a chance to read and review this book, I was interested.

I have seen the very famous 's film, so I figured I knew how the book ended. I hadn't realized till the end that there were going to be two books int he saga.

Her greatest generals, the consuls Lucius Licinius Lucullus and Marcus Aurelius Cotta, were attending to the subjugation of the Eastern kingdom of Bithynia , a recent addition to the republic.

The raids carried out in the Campanian countryside by Spartacus' men fell to local officials to mediate. These praetors , including Gaius Claudius Glaber and Publius Varinius, underestimated the training and ingenuity of the enslaved fighters.

Glaber thought he could lay siege to the redoubt of enslaved people at Vesuvius, but the enslaved people dramatically rappelled down the mountainside with ropes fashioned from vines, outflanked Glaber's force, and destroyed it.

By the winter of 72 BCE, the successes of the army of enslaved people alarmed Rome to the degree that consular armies were raised to deal with the threat.

Marcus Licinius Crassus was elected praetor and headed to Picenum to put an end to the Spartacan revolt with 10 legions, some 32, to 48, trained Roman fighters, plus auxiliary units.

Crassus correctly assumed the enslaved people would head north to the Alps and positioned most of his men to block this escape.

Meanwhile, he sent his lieutenant Mummius and two new legions south to pressure the enslaved people to move north. Mummius had been explicitly instructed not to fight a pitched battle.

He had ideas of his own, however, and when he engaged the enslaved people in battle, he suffered defeat. Spartacus routed Mummius and his legions.

They lost not only men and their arms, but later, when they returned to their commander, the survivors suffered the ultimate Roman military punishment—decimation, by order of Crassus.

The men were divided into groups of 10 and then drew lots. The unlucky one in 10 was then killed. Meanwhile, Spartacus turned around and headed toward Sicily, planning to escape on pirate ships, not knowing that the pirates had already sailed away.

At the Isthmus of Bruttium, Crassus built a wall to block Spartacus' escape. When the enslaved people tried to break through, the Romans fought back and killed about 12, of them.

Spartacus learned that Crassus' troops were to be reinforced by another Roman army under Pompey , brought back from Spain. Also, while Spartacus was a real person who has inspired revolutionaries and filmmakers, scholars do not have an abundant amount of information about him.

Accounts from only about a dozen ancient writers survive to this day, and none of the surviving reports was written by Spartacus or one of his supporters.

According to the surviving sources, Spartacus was from Thrace, an area in southeast Europe that the Romans were often trying to subjugate during the first century B.

He appears to have served in a Roman auxiliary unit for a time, deserted and became either a bandit or insurgent against the Romans.

While at the school, Spartacus helped organize a breakout that led to more than 70 gladiators escaping armed with knives, cleavers and other makeshift weapons they got from the kitchen.

One of the people Spartacus escaped with was his wife, a Thracian woman whose name is lost to history. The writer Plutarch, who lived in the second century A.

Martins, Spartacus and his small band of escapees acquired gladiator weapons from a passing cart and made their way to Mount Vesuvius. On their way, Spartacus and his co-leaders, Crixus and Oenomaus, raided for supplies and recruited slaves in the countryside.

Furthermore, a group of escaped slaves were not seen as posing a serious challenge to Roman soldiers. The Romans despatched a praetor named Gaius Claudius Glaber to form an army to crush the slaves.

Instead, they blocked off the main route up Vesuvius, pitched camp and tried to starve him out. Spartacus took the initiative, having his newly liberated slaves build rope out of wild vines so they could move down the mountainside to a spot the Roman had neglected to defend.

The Romans, still in camp, never saw them coming. This success resulted in new recruits flocking to the force of Spartacus. Throughout his rebellion, his army spent much of its time in rural areas and small towns, places that were poorly defended but had an abundance of slaves.

Additionally, according to ancient sources, Spartacus insisted on equally dividing the spoils, something that made recruitment all the more easier.

In time, he even succeeded in getting non-slaves to join his rebellion. Spartacus continued to ambush and defeat Roman units while freeing slaves in the countryside and gathering supplies.

Each man may have commanded 10, troops. By the spring of 72 B. This did not work out well for the rebels. The Roman force under Gellius caught up with Crixus, killing the leader along with many of his rebels.

Schwester Spartacus, Er nahm auch an der Rebellion, selbst fiel er mit einem Gladiator in der Liebe, genannt Artoriks, die führte einen Teil der Rebellenarmee, als er starb in der Schlacht, Spartacus Online Iphone App Store tötete sich für die Liebe, aber das ist eine andere Geschichte vergessener…. Die Römer schnappen sich seine überlebenden Mitstreiter und richten sie grausam hin. Warum tun sie sich nicht zusammen, um gemeinsam für ihre Freiheit zu Free Slot Java Mulatten wurden massakriert, Geiseln nach Belieben getötet. Die Einzelkämpfe waren festen Regeln unterworfen. Im Jahr 73 v. Wer nach ordentlichem Kampf unterlag, erhielt meist die missio ehrenhafte Mischmaschine Gebraucht und überlebte. Videospiele Filme TV Wikis. Unruhig wälzt er sich herum. Spartacus und die Gladiatoren — kein Thema der römischen 7 Spiele wurde in den letzten Jahren mittels effektvoller Free Cash Point so bis zur Unkenntlichkeit verzerrt. Jahrhundert v. Und von ihnen gibt es unzählige im Römischen Reich! Ist er wirklich durch die Römer gestorben?? This website uses cookies Tetrix improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Funktionell Performance. Spartacus und seine Männer entkommen über selbst gebastelte Strickleitern.

Three Gallic enslaved people—Crixus, Oenomaus, and Castus—became, along with Spartacus, the leaders of the band. Seizing a defensive position in the mountains near Vesuvius, they attracted thousands of enslaved people from the countryside—70, men, with another 50, women and children in tow.

The rebellion of enslaved people happened at a moment when Rome's legions were abroad. Her greatest generals, the consuls Lucius Licinius Lucullus and Marcus Aurelius Cotta, were attending to the subjugation of the Eastern kingdom of Bithynia , a recent addition to the republic.

The raids carried out in the Campanian countryside by Spartacus' men fell to local officials to mediate. These praetors , including Gaius Claudius Glaber and Publius Varinius, underestimated the training and ingenuity of the enslaved fighters.

Glaber thought he could lay siege to the redoubt of enslaved people at Vesuvius, but the enslaved people dramatically rappelled down the mountainside with ropes fashioned from vines, outflanked Glaber's force, and destroyed it.

By the winter of 72 BCE, the successes of the army of enslaved people alarmed Rome to the degree that consular armies were raised to deal with the threat.

Marcus Licinius Crassus was elected praetor and headed to Picenum to put an end to the Spartacan revolt with 10 legions, some 32, to 48, trained Roman fighters, plus auxiliary units.

Crassus correctly assumed the enslaved people would head north to the Alps and positioned most of his men to block this escape.

Meanwhile, he sent his lieutenant Mummius and two new legions south to pressure the enslaved people to move north.

Mummius had been explicitly instructed not to fight a pitched battle. He had ideas of his own, however, and when he engaged the enslaved people in battle, he suffered defeat.

Spartacus routed Mummius and his legions. They lost not only men and their arms, but later, when they returned to their commander, the survivors suffered the ultimate Roman military punishment—decimation, by order of Crassus.

The men were divided into groups of 10 and then drew lots. The unlucky one in 10 was then killed. Meanwhile, Spartacus turned around and headed toward Sicily, planning to escape on pirate ships, not knowing that the pirates had already sailed away.

At the Isthmus of Bruttium, Crassus built a wall to block Spartacus' escape. When the enslaved people tried to break through, the Romans fought back and killed about 12, of them.

Spartacus learned that Crassus' troops were to be reinforced by another Roman army under Pompey , brought back from Spain. In desperation, he and the people he enslaved fled north, with Crassus at their heels.

Spartacus' escape route was blocked at Brundisium by a third Roman force recalled from Macedonia. There was nothing left for Spartacus to do but to try to beat Crassus' army in battle.

The Spartacans were quickly surrounded and butchered, although many men escaped into the mountains. Only 1, Romans died.

Six thousand of the fleeing enslaved people were captured by Crassus' troops and crucified along the Appian Way , from Capua to Rome.

Spartacus' body was not found. But in an age where basic hygiene like handwashing was rare and antibiotics didn't exist, even superficial wounds could prove fatal for one or both fighters.

And many fights only ended when one gladiator had killed another. A few fortunate gladiators found fame through bloodshed.

They won fight after fight, making names for themselves and becoming something akin to Roman rock stars. They had slaves to look after them and in very rare cases became the most popular figures in their cities.

However, the vast numbers of gladiators faced short, desperate lives. That's why Spartacus and 70 other gladiators made a daring escape from a gladiator school in 73 B.

Then, they hijacked a caravan carrying a load of gladiator weapons and armor — and suddenly, they were the equivalent of a heavily armed gang, with Spartacus as their initial leader.

The men continued to train themselves for combat at a location on Mount Vesuvius, occasionally raiding the countryside below. Eventually, Spartacus and his men caught the attention of Rome.

A praetor a high-ranking government official by the name of Claudius Glaber was sent to put down Spartacus, says Irvin. This victory proved monumental in Roman — and human — history.

Before that, slaves in Rome felt so hopeless in their lives that they rarely tried to escape. There was nowhere to escape to, Irvin points out, no equivalent of the northern states during the U.

People were so resigned to their sorry fates that they didn't even require supervision. But Spartacus and his men provided the spark of hope that became a wildfire of armed rage.

Other slaves — and prisoners of war — ran away to join the uprising. Both men and women, of very different backgrounds, saw Spartacus as a way to fight back against their oppressors.

Although records from the time are unreliable, they may have swelled the rebel army's ranks to tens or even hundreds of thousands.

Spartacus won at least three more military engagements. As gladiators, these men had nothing to lose, so they fought with little fear.

Some probably believed that ultimately, they must bring down the pillars of Roman political power or risk being captured and forced back into bondage.

That's exactly why Rome's leaders knew they needed to find a way to kill Spartacus once and for all. He says that it also helped that Spartacus kept winning, defeating a number of praetors sent against him.

The rebel leader even triumphed over armies of the Roman consuls, the heads of the entire Roman government, and commanders-in-chief of the armies.

They also didn't understand that their slim grasp on power relied almost totally on the perception of Roman military might.

One chink in that mental armor — a few Spartacus victories — and the revolt became real. Rome was rattled.

Its veteran armies were deployed elsewhere, and the city had only a ragtag force left to oppose any attackers. So frightening had Spartacus become that, eventually no leaders could be found to take the reins of a force against him.

Spartacus: The Gladiator: (Spartacus 1) | Kane, Ben | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Das Leben des Spartacus wurde oft verfilmt. Doch in vielen Streifen wimmelt es von Fehlern. So war der Gladiator kein Grobian, sondern recht. Spartacus (Spartacus, A.C.) Es ist eine historische Figur in einem amerikanischen Film beruhte auf (selbst. Find Spartacus: der Gladiator Von Rom [Import allemand] at tastystuff.se Movies & TV, home of thousands of titles on DVD and Blu-ray. Infos & Bestellung zu 'SuperStars: Spartacus der Gladiator' vom Mildenberger Verlag. 24 S., vierf., Br, 16,7 x 22, 8 cm, Bestellnummer: And even the young Roman Carbo who meets Spartacus at the ludus and becomes a Space Invaders Scratch of volunteer to be in the Sphinx Slot Kostenlos school and is under Spartacus' wing. When his offer was refused, he made a risky move, charging toward Brundisium with Crassus in pursuit. More than 70, slaves had taken up arms and effectively battled local militia until a Roman army triumphed over the rebels two years later. So if you're reading this Ben, sorry. I Gry Slizing Hot Za Darmo sent a copy of this book in exchange for my Hindenburgstr Gummersbach. Stealing military-grade weapons, they set out south to Mount Vesuvius.

Spartacus The Gladiator Inhaltsverzeichnis

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